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TT: Urban Survival and Prepping for Beginners: Bugging In vs. Bugging Out

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Buggin' Out with the JIC

Previously, we discussed the bare essentials for survival—food and water. This week’s two rules are “Bugging in means bugging in”and the importance of mapping out and practicing an escape plan. Not everyone has the ways and means to leave when the S really HTF. Some have unreliable transportation or no personal transportation at all. Others may not have the luxury of having a bug-out location, family, or friends to run to. That doesn’t mean you can’t survive. In some cases, bugging in is the best and safest option—especially if you live in the middle of a cramped and crowded city where leaving would be next to impossible.

Big city sky line at duskIn some cases, bugging in is the best and safest option—especially if you live in the middle of a cramped and crowded city where leaving would be next to impossible.

Rule #3: Bugging In Means Bugging In

This is why it is so important to begin building your preps now—a month worth of non-perishable food items and plenty of water.

Wondering the streets during upheaval and social chaos is incredibly dangerous. You not only face law enforcement and possibly military troops, but city curfews, street closures, rioters, and looters, as well as the desperate or criminal types who want what you have. Why risk it when stores will be ransacked, empty and even boarded up?

Rule #4: Have an Exit Strategy

Fire or damage to your building, or criminal or squatter takeover will force you out. You will need a safe way to escape.

Follow the American Red Cross’ fire escape plan:

  • Designate a meeting place outside your home. Make sure every family member is clear where that meeting place is.
  • Plan two escape routes out of your home.
  • You have two minutes to get out if there is a fire. Practice your two-minute escape drill at least twice a year.

If you live in a tall building or have a multi-story house, keep a fire escape ladder in each bedroom. Install emergency release latches if you have bars on the windows of your home.

Buggin' Out with the JICHave a packed bug-out bag for every member of the family in case you are forced to leave. This one includes the Mossberg 500 JIC shotgun.

Have a packed bug-out bag for every member of the family in case you are forced to leave. If you have a vehicle, always keep the gas tank full. Now would not be the time to try to get gas from your local or even out-of-the-way gas station. One of four things are likely to happen. There will be no more gas. There will be a very long line to get gas. The state will control how much gas you are allowed. Any number of those issues will cause people to become stressed, aggravated, and angry. This is not a good mix. The quicker you can leave town, the better.

Your bug-out bag (at the very least) should include:

  • A water filter
  • First aid kit
  • Fire starter
  • Copies of important documents
  • Essential prescription medications
  • Cell phone charger
  • Emergency poncho
  • Boots or sturdy tennis shoes
  • Extra pairs of socks
  • Knife or multi tool
  • Cash
  • Firearm and ammo
  • Emergency blanket

Of course, we all have our separate individual needs, some care for elderly family members, young children, or people with special medical or behavior needs. Everyone will need to be accommodated. It is impossible to have you fully prepared by just one post, but this one is a great step in the right direction. If you have questions or tips and suggestions, leave them in the comment section.

To learn more about bug-out bags, click here.

Do you have set rules for deciding when to bug out or bug in? Share them in the comment section.

Source: Cheaper Than Dirt

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